Thumbs Up, Thumbs Down

Thumbs up to Delta Airlines who became the first airline to invite its employees to add a visible language bar to their uniforms to show fluency in one of the more than 300 sign languages around the world.

Thumbs down to Veterans Affairs Canada officials who still seem to be having trouble answering the phone. The VAC toll free service, intended to help veterans and their families seeking access to benefits and services (and those dealing with mental trauma and physical injuries) has—despite years of public criticism—continued to get worse rather than better. According to a recent report published by Canadian Press, only 65% of calls were answered within their two minute target. Another 84,000 cases (about one in every five calls) were categorized as abandoned, meaning the caller hung up before officials could answer. Come on guys… surely you can do better than this for those who’ve served our country!

Thumbs up to Wimbledon for continuing to showcase inclusivity by featuring quad division tennis for the first time for athletes with both upper and low limb impairments. Wheelchair tennis has been a feature at the championships since 2005, with the first men’s wheelchair doubles. The quad division allows players who would have difficulty maneuvering manually to use powerchairs, as well as players with weak grips having the option to tape rackets to their hands or use gloves.

Thumbs down to a SkyWest Airlines Crew who walked off the plane rather than letting Tayo Isola, who is non-verbal and autistic, switch seats to be next to a family member. Even after discussions with his brother (and an offer from another passenger who was willing to move), the crew was not well trained in the customer service procedures necessary to accommodate Isola. 75 other people were also inconvenienced.

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